Am I required to have an OSHA card?

State-Specific OSHA Requirements

Although initially conceived as a voluntary program, seven states have crafted legislation to make OSHA 10 and/or 30-hour training mandatory for employees. Ensure you are certified in OSHA 10 or 30-hour with ClickSafety's OSHA-Authorized online training program.

Connecticut
The OSHA 10 hour construction course is required for all employees of any public building project paid for in whole or part by state funding, or any of its agencies, where the total cost is over $100,000. Each contractor needs to furnish proof that all employees have taken the OSHA 10 hour construction course within 30 days of being awarded the contract. Employees who have not completed the course are subject to removal from the worksite. As in virtually all situations, the OSHA 10 hour course completion card or other proof, like a completion certificate is required to show compliance. The law went into effect in 2007.


Missouri
Missouri requires OSHA 10 hour training for any employee who works on any sort of public works project, whether at the state or municipal level. The state requires employees complete a minimum of an OSHA 10-hour training course within 60 days of beginning work on a project, the employer doesn’t need to provide the contracting agency proof of training unless it is specifically requested. The state does not require the training to be renewed. The law went into effect in 2009.

Massachusetts
All employees to be employed at the worksite needs to complete the OSHA 10 hour construction course before beginning work on the worksite. Any employee found on a worksite subject to this section without documentation of successful completion of the OSHA 10 hour course shall be subject to immediate removal. The Mass. lawspecifically says "At least 10 hours" so the OSHA 30 hour construction course would also enable the worker to meet these requirements. The law went into effect in 2004.

New Hampshire
All on-site employees, working on publicly funded (including state, or local municipality) projects of $100,000 or more, must complete the OSHA 10 Hour Construction course prior to beginning work. An employee who has not completed the program shall be subject to removal from the worksite after 15 days of being found to be non-compliant. The New Hampshire law provides for penalties to the employer of up to $2,500 and a civil penalty of $100 per employee for each day of noncompliance. The law went into effect in 2007.

New York State
Every worker needs to be certified as having completed an OSHA 10 safety training course on public work projects of $250,000 or more. The intent is to require that all employees of public work contractors receive such training "prior to the performing any work on the project." Proof of completion may include a copy of a course completion card.
Special circumstances for New York City- The OSHA 10 hour construction course is required on all NYC DOB major public and private projects, and certifications must be current within 5 years. The requirements went into effect in 2008.

Nevada
Nevada requires all construction workers in the state to undergo an OSHA 10-hour training course at least once every five years. The training must be completed no more than 15 days of being hired. All supervisors on a construction site are required to undergo an OSHA 30-hour safety training course at least once every five years. The training must be completed no more than 15 days of being hired. If an employee or supervisor does not gain 10 or 30-hour certification, then their employment must be terminated or suspended. Employers who fail to terminate or suspend employees are subject to administrative fines and penalties. The state briefly experimented with 5 and 15 hour OSHA refresher courses after the initial 10-hour and 30 hour courses respectively, but that initiative has since been disbanded. The law went into effect in
2011.

Rhode Island
Rhode Island requires that all workers on municipal and state construction projects with a total project cost of over $100,000 complete the OSHA 10 hour construction course. This requirement is for on-site workers, including, construction workers, contractors, project developers, site managers, and/or any other individual(s) working on a jobsite. Law enforcement officers and/or jobsite security are exempt, as are all federal, state and municipal government inspectors. Fines for non-compliance are between $250 and $950, per offense, per day. This requirement began in 2004.

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